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Cell therapy company eyeing HQ move to Tampa

By Margie Manning, Tampa Bay Business Journal

A biopharma firm that has been collaborating with Moffitt Cancer Center on potential cancer treatments hopes to seal a deal in the next 30 to 60 days to locate its headquarters on the Moffitt campus.

Another company, Iovance Biotherapeutics (NASDAQ: IOVA), formerly Lion Biotechnologies Inc., is working with Moffitt on several potential cancer therapies. Iovance is headquartered in San Carlos, California, but its research and development facilities are at the University of South Florida Research Park. Iovance leases 8,673 square feet for 16 full-time employees in Tampa and four more who travel to Tampa on an every other week basis to be with their team on the ground, said Maria Fardis, president and CEO.

Amanda Stramer, a process development associate scientist at Iovance, was one of nine individuals featured recently in the Florida High Tech Corridor’s “Faces of Technology.” See a video profile produced by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council, an economic development initiative of USF, UCF and the University of Florida.

Read more at https://www.bizjournals.com/tampabay/news/2018/03/23/cell-therapy-company-eyeing-hq-move-to-tampa.html.

Three Central Florida tech pros get Corridor recognition

By Marco Santana, Orlando Sentinel

Three Central Florida tech professionals will join others from around the state on an annual “Faces of Technology” list distributed by the Florida High Tech Corridor.

Abe A.I. CEO Robert Guilfoyle, data scientist Michael Moskal II and senior software engineer Derrick Sines landed on the list, which was first publicized in the Corridor’s annual magazine.

In a release, Corridor President Ed Schons said the trio has contributed to the region’s tech ecosystem in a positive way.

Read the full story:  http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/technology/os-bz-corridor-faces-20180314-story.html

Nine Innovators Honored As Florida High Tech Corridor’s 2018 “Faces of Technology”

Local Talent Illustrates the Workforce Behind Florida’s Burgeoning High Tech Hub

HEATHROW, Fla. (March 12, 2018) – Striving to develop and advance new solutions for global energy solutions, military programs, financial services, STEM learning and more, nine technology leaders from across the 23-county Florida High Tech Corridor region were named as its 2018 “Faces of Technology.”

These impressive innovators embody the talent behind The Corridor’s burgeoning 23-county high tech region and are featured in its annual magazine, florida.HIGH.TECH 2018 and online at www.facesoftechnology.com.

The Corridor’s 2018 “Faces of Technology” are:

  1. Robert Guilfoyle, Co-Founder and CEO, Abe I. (Orlando) – Guilfoyle leads the Orlando company’s work to create hassle-free digital banking solutions using artificial intelligence.
  2. Marina Jarova, Co-Founder, Integral Academy (Palm Coast) – Jarova co-founded Integral Academy, a forward-thinking tutoring and STEM enrichment program for students through college.
  3. Michael D. Moskal II, Senior Data Scientist, OSTHUS (formerly manager of research programs, Modus Operandi, Melbourne) With Modus Operandi, Moskal helped research and develop secure software solutions for the U.S. defense and intelligence communities.
  4. Greg Ross-Munro, CEO, Sourcetoad (Tampa) Ross-Munro developed Sourcetoad, a consulting and software development firm that supports the hospitality, health care and education industries.
  5. Derrick Sines, Senior Software Engineer, Riptide Software (Oviedo) Sines leads the generation of cutting-edge simulation and training systems that support the military.
  6. Deepika Singh, Co-Founder and President, Sinmat (Gainesville) – Singh manufactures chemical mechanical polishing solutions to create flawless microchips that power smarter energy systems.
  7. Amanda Stramer, Process Development Associate Scientist, Iovance Biotherapeutics (Tampa) – At Iovance Biotherapeutics, Stramer focuses on the development and commercialization of cancer immunotherapies.
  8. Lindsey Tropf, Co-Founder and CEO, Immersed Games (Gainesville) – Tropf develops educational online games that empower problem-solving and experimental learning.
  9. Christoph Ziegler, Lead Industrial and Product Designer, AVEO Engineering (Palm Coast) – Ziegler designs LED solutions for the aerospace, marine and vehicle lighting industries.

“We are proud to recognize these individuals for their contributions to our region’s high tech industry,” said Ed Schons, president of The Corridor.  “These brilliant minds embody the talent that makes our 23-county region an ideal place for research, discovery and business development.”

Launched in 2008, The Corridor’s “Faces of Technology” initiative has recognized the efforts of nearly 160 people who represent the more than 250,000 high tech scientists and technologists driving diverse clusters of innovation throughout the region.  For more information about The Corridor and its “Faces of Technology,” visit www.floridahightech.com.

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Florida High Tech Corridor Sector Statistics Illustrate Growth Across 23 Counties

Increases in Number of Companies and Annual Wages Indicate Growing Prominence of High Tech Industry from Sun Coast to Space Coast

Included in the latest edition of its annual magazine, florida.HIGH.TECH 2018, the Florida High Tech Corridor Council has published high tech industry sector statistics providing a timely snapshot of technology-based economic trends within the 23-county region.

Key findings in this year’s report include information on the number of technology establishments, number of technology jobs and salary information across all high tech industry sectors:  financial services, information technology, aerospace, microelectronics, medical technology, photonics, engineering services, wired telecommunications carriers, other scientific and technical consulting services, radio and television broadcasting, wireless communications and equipment manufacturing.

The Corridor region supports an estimated 21,979 technology establishments and 252,439 jobs.  These high tech jobs are also high-wage; the average salary across all sectors is $86,096.  These statistics are based upon the most recent employer data available in the first quarter of 2017 from the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, aggregated at the county-by-county level.

This year, more than 1,000 new science and technology establishments opened their doors in the region, representing a 4.8 percent increase from the previous year – the largest in 10 years.  Salaries in these fields also saw dramatic growth, rising 8.5 percent from 2016.

“We understand how important it is for economic development professionals and decision makers to stay abreast of industry trends – not just those who live in the area, but also for those who are scouring the map to find the perfect place to start or expand a business,” said Ed Schons, president of The Corridor.  “This data demonstrates an upward trend for economic development in our region, making The Corridor an ideal location for high tech business growth.”

Detailed data on each sector can be viewed online at magazine.floridahightech.com, along with The Corridor’s annual report and stories on the exciting innovations advancing technology within the region.

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Corridor Researchers Elected as 2017 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors

Four Academic Inventors Join Elite Group of the Nation’s Foremost Innovators

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2017) – Four academic inventors representing the three member institutions of The Corridor – the University of Central Florida, the University of Florida and the University of South Florida – have been elected as 2017 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

The 2017 NAI Fellows from The Corridor institutions are:

• Anthony B. Brennan, Margaret A. Ross Endowed Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida
• Aravinda Kar, Professor, College of Optics & Photonics, University of Central Florida
• Donald B. Keck, Professor, Institute for Advanced Discovery & Innovation, University of South Florida
• Dennis K. Killinger, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus, Department of Physics, University of South Florida

“The four 2017 NAI Fellows in The Corridor region represent a rich diversity of research and innovation in the area,” said Ed Schons, president of the Florida High Tech Corridor Council. “Their work in biomedical engineering, physics, optics and photonics has positively impacted society by taking risks necessary for advancement. These individuals are an example of what many in The Corridor do – experiment, collaborate and impact lives for the better.”

These four innovators are among the 155 academic inventors selected for induction as NAI Fellows this year and join a group that now comprises 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and nonprofit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

On Apr. 5, 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection in Washington, D.C. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. commissioner for patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The inventors elected to the 2017 class of NAI Fellows from Florida’s major research institutions exemplify the incredible innovation fueling the state,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention – their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and nonprofit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and, 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

A complete list of NAI Fellows, including links to biographical information, is available here: http://www.academyofinventors.org/search-fellows.asp.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a 501(c)(3) non-profit member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors. www.academyofinventors.org

About The Florida High Tech Corridor Council
The Florida High Tech Corridor Council is an economic development initiative of the University of Central Florida (UCF), the University of South Florida (USF) and the University of Florida (UF). The mission of The Corridor is to grow high tech industry and innovation through partnerships that support research, marketing, workforce and entrepreneurship.

A partnership involving more than 25 local and regional economic development organizations (EDOs), 14 state colleges and 12 CareerSource boards, The Corridor is co-chaired by the presidents of UCF, USF and UF. The Corridor includes the presidents of two state colleges, the president of the Florida Institute of Technology and representatives of high tech industry.
The unique partnership has resulted in a strategic approach to high tech economic development that supports matching funds research, marketing, workforce development and entrepreneurship leveraging governmental, EDO and corporate budgets on a regional rather than local basis.

For more information, visit www.floridahightech.com.

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Pasco Hernando State College President Joins Florida High Tech Corridor Council

PHSC Leader Brings Expertise in Higher Education and Workforce Readiness to The Corridor

HEATHROW, Fla. (September 21, 2017) – Timothy Beard, Ph.D., president of Pasco Hernando State College (PHSC), is the newest member of the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

Beard joined PHSC in 2007 as the vice president of student development and enrollment management after more than 30 years in education and student services.  Selected to serve as the college’s fourth president in 2015, Beard has seen enrollment rise by 40 percent under his leadership and several programs spearheaded by Beard have been recognized as “Exemplary Best Practices” by the Association of Florida Colleges.

Beard’s expertise and knowledge in higher education and workforce development will help guide The Corridor in its mission to grow high tech industry and innovation through partnerships that support research, marketing, workforce and entrepreneurship.

Previously, Beard served as dean and vice president of student affairs for the University of South Alabama, providing leadership, strategic vision and oversight to foster an environment that emphasized student success, development and engagement.

Beard earned an M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling and a Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Counseling with an emphasis in Higher Education Administration from Florida State University.  He serves on numerous boards and advisory councils throughout Florida, including the Florida College System Council of Presidents, the Center for Community Enrichment Board of Directors, Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point, the Salvation Army Advisory Council and the Pasco Economic Development Council.

 

About The Florida High Tech Corridor Council

The Florida High Tech Corridor Council is an economic development initiative of the University of Central Florida (UCF), the University of South Florida (USF) and the University of Florida (UF).  The mission of The Corridor is to grow high tech industry and innovation through partnerships that support research, marketing, workforce and entrepreneurship.

A partnership involving more than 25 local and regional economic development organizations (EDOs), 14 state colleges and 12 CareerSource boards, The Corridor is co-chaired by the presidents of UCF, USF and UF. The Corridor includes the presidents of two state colleges, the president of the Florida Institute of Technology and representatives of high tech industry.

The unique partnership has resulted in a strategic approach to high tech economic development that supports matching funds research, marketing, workforce development and entrepreneurship leveraging governmental, EDO and corporate budgets on a regional rather than local basis.  For more information, visit www.floridahightech.com.

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The Corridor Highlights Health Care, a Unique Biotech Workforce Credential and Tourism

Stories of High Tech Activity Bring People and Companies in the Region Alive

Heathrow, Fla. (Sept. 8, 2017) – The Corridor is charged to grow high tech industry in a 23-county region and new stories of that growth have been shared by the organization in its digital magazine.

A glimpse into new stories…

Have you ever written something off as ‘impossible’ only to be happily proved wrong?

Niko Pamboukas knows that feeling.  His son, Zachary Pamboukas, was born without an arm and has spent most of his life getting creative when tasks, like riding a bicycle, called for using two arms.  Niko had written off a ‘normal’ life for his son, Zachary, until they were introduced to Orlando’s Limbitless Solutions.  The company creates bionic arms for children at the fraction of market cost using 3-D printing technology.

It is in good company among leaders in research, patient care and a medical city that represent health care innovation happening in The Corridor.

The Corridor is also home to a unique credential in biotechnology earned through the Biotechnician Assistant Credentialing Exam (BACE), which is often taken before graduating high school.  It was created by the University of Florida’s Biotility, an organization focused on building a biotechnology workforce, to help students develop and validate skills in high demand by private industry.  It has gained prestige as it was adopted in Florida and Arizona, and piloted in Louisiana, Oklahoma, Texas and Washington.  Syngenta, a worldwide agritechnology company, has hired recent high school graduates because of the credential.

Lastly, our region is known for creating unbelievable experiences.  Visitors flock to Florida and are met with entertainment technology at various venues that deliver lasting memories.  Theme parks come to mind, but the behind-the-scenes high tech work is not limited to these thrill rides. The Corridor has more to offer.

Read more about these stories and others in the latest Corridor magazine, florida.HIGH.TECH 2017 available at http://magazine.floridahightech.com/.

 

About the Florida High Tech Corridor Council

The Florida High Tech Corridor Council is an economic development initiative of the University of Central Florida (UCF), the University of South Florida (USF) and the University of Florida (UF).  The mission of The Corridor is to grow high tech industry and innovation through partnerships that support research, marketing, workforce and entrepreneurship.

A partnership involving more than 25 local and regional economic development organizations (EDOs), 14 state colleges and 12 CareerSource boards, The Corridor is co-chaired by the presidents of UCF, USF and UF.  The Corridor includes the presidents of two state colleges, the president of the Florida Institute of Technology and representatives of high tech industry.

The unique partnership has resulted in a strategic approach to high tech economic development that supports matching funds research, marketing, workforce development and entrepreneurship leveraging governmental, EDO and corporate budgets on a regional rather than local basis.

For more information, visit www.floridahightech.com.

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Media Contacts:

If you are seeking information about The Corridor or the initiatives of the Council, please contact:

Kacie Escobar
Curley & Pynn Public Relations
kescobar@thestrategicfirm.com
(407) 423-8006

We would be happy to put you in contact with industry experts who can speak to a variety of technology topics in their area of expertise. For a preview of the leaders who can share their experience in growing tech-based businesses in the Corridor, explore the videos of our Faces of Technology.